OUR TRAINING PROGRAMMES

If you are interested in any of our training programmes listed below, please contact us for a formal quotation.

  • All our programmes are suitable for corporate clients in the private sector, public sector entities, tertiary institutions and non-profit organisations.
  • Programmes will be customised for the particular industry and client needs.
  • The duration of each programme can be adapted.
  • Our training programmes comply with CPD accreditation standards.

LIST OF TRAINING PROGRAMMES

1.   FOUNDATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMMES

1.1 Board and executive management

Name of course Content
Director’s duties (Full day)
    • Duties of company directors and prescribed officers
      • Common law duties
      • Making the right decisions
      • The Companies Act of 2008
        • Defining directors and prescribed officers
        • Legal responsibilities and liability
      • Ethical leadership
        • Case studies
Ethical leadership (Full day)
  • Ethics vocabulary
    • Defining ethical behaviour
    • Ethical dilemmas and decision-making
  • Creating a culture of integrity
    • The steps of an ethics management programme (King IV Report)
    •  The role of corporate values
    • Ethics statements (examples)
  • Tone at the top
    •  The characteristics of an ethical leader
    • Case studies
Anti-corruption, corporate and ethics governance for top management (One or two days)
  • Imperatives for preventing corruption and being ethical
    •  Best-practice guidelines
    • Local and international legislation
  • Explanation of high risk occupational crimes
    • Corruption, fraud and anti-competitive behaviour
    • Conflicts of interest
  • Practising good corporate governance
    • Introduction to the King IV Report
    • Implementing a compliance framework
  • Creating a culture of integrity
    • Ethics codes
    • Governance of ethics
  • Cost-benefit analysis – does it pay to be ethical?
Corruption and fraud prevention (Full day)
  • Imperatives for preventing corruption and being ethical
  • Explanation of high risk occupational crimes
    • Corruption and forms of corruption
    • Fraud and conflicts of interest
  • Duties of the Social and Ethics Committee
  • Anti-corruption policies and tools
  • Cost-benefit analysis – does it pay to do honest business?

1.2 Senior and middle management

Name of course Content
Prevention of corruption and unethical behaviour in the workplace (One or two full days)
  • Module 1: Imperatives for preventing occupational crimes and unethical behaviour
    • Cost of criminal, unethical and dishonest behaviour
    • Reasons for crime and unethical behaviour
  • Module 2: Preventative measures
    • Corporate governance
      • The elements of a compliance framework – international standard
      • Consequences of non-compliance
  • Module 3: Organisational ethics
    • Ethics in the workplace
      • How to create a culture of integrity
    • Cost-benefit analysis
Ethical leadership (Full day)
  • Ethical decision-making
    • Being intellectually honest
    • Avoiding conflicts of interest
  • Ethics management
    • The steps of an ethics management programme (King IV Report)
    • The role and benefits of corporate values
    • Ethics statements (examples)
    • Integrating values with operations
  • Setting the example
    • The characteristics of an ethical leader
Being an ethical manager (Full day)
  • Definition of business ethics
  • Cost-benefit analysis
    • Does it pay to be ethical?
  • Ethics vocabulary
  • Ethical decision-making
  • Being an ethical manager
    • Living your values
      • Integrity
      • Fairness/equality
      • Respect
  • The qualities of an ethical leader
  • Managing organisational ethics
    • The new King IV recommendations
Presentation and facilitation skills (Full day)
  • The difference between presentation and facilitation
  • Different ways of communicating
    • Defining verbal and non-verbal communication
  • Key pointers to remember when presenting/facilitating
  • Preparations before presenting or facilitating a session
  • Having integrity
  • Being professional
    • Looking the part
    • Acting the part
  • The art of listening
  • Presentation exercise
    • Individual presentations and group critique
The ethics of social media (Full day)
  • The ethical dimensions of social media
    • Ethics vocabulary
    • Ethical decision-making
  • Social media definitions
  • SA Social Media Landscape 2018 Report
  • Risks associated to social media
    • Case law
    • Costs
  • Guidelines for using social media
  • Social media policies
    • Examples
  • Social media behaviours

1.3 Staff and key suppliers

Name of course Content
Blow the whistle (Half day)
  • Imperatives for reporting crime and irregularities
  • Your ethical duty to report
  • How to blow the whistle
    • What happens when you call the hotline
    • What to say
    • Acting in good faith
    • Reporting policies
  • Legal protection for whistle-blowers
    • When you suffer “occupational detriment”
  • Obligation of the employer
    • The Protected Disclosures Amendment Act
Ethics in action: how to be ethical at work (Full day)
  • Ethics vocabulary
  • Ethical decision-making
  • Organisational and personal values
  • Putting organisational values in context
    • Living the values at work
  • Ethics and me
  • Ethics pledge
Prevention of corruption (Full day)
  • How crime and dishonesty impact on your salary and job security
  • How to recognise corruption and occupational crimes
  • Your role in preventing corruption, irregularities and unethical behaviour
  • Reporting wrongdoing at work
  • Being ethical
The ethics of social media (Full day)
  • The ethical dimensions of social media
    • Ethics vocabulary
    • Ethical decision-making
  • Social media definitions
  • SA Social Media Landscape 2018 Report
  • Risks associated to social media
    • Case law
    • Costs
  • Guidelines for using social media
  • Social media policies
    • Examples
  • Social media behaviours

1.4 Unschooled labour

Name of course Content
Ethics and me (Full day)
  • Crimes at work
    • Corruption, fraud and theft
    • Examples of irregularities
    • Examples of unethical behaviour
  • How to prevent workplace crimes
  • Doing the right thing      
  • Living the organisational values
    • Practical exercises
  • Ethics pledge

 2.   SPECIALIST PROGRAMMES

2.1 Members of social and ethics governing board committees

Name of course Content
Responsibilities and rights of the Social and Ethics Committee (Full day)
  • Imperatives for a Social and Ethics Committee
  • Duties of company directors and prescribed officers
  • Duties and mandate of the Social and Ethics Committee
  • Local and international anti-corruption legislation and best practice guidelines
  • Anti-corruption measures
    • Due diligence scrutiny
    • The UNGC Anti-corruption Management Tool
  • Ethics management
    • King IV Report

2.2 Ethics and compliance for compliance officers

Name of course Content
Ethics and compliance for compliance officers (Two full days)
  • Imperatives for ethical behaviour
    • Cost of criminal, unethical and dishonest behaviour
    • International and local research and surveys
  • High-risk occupational crimes
  • Best-practice guidelines
    • UN Global Compact
    • US Federal Sentencing Guidelines
    • UK Bribery Act
    • SA Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act
    • SA Companies Act
    • International prosecutions: case studies
  • Compliance and corporate governance
    • Legal enforceability of the King Reports
    • Elements of a compliance framework
    • Due diligence requirements
    • Governance of corporate ethics
    • Ethics vocabulary
    • Ethical dilemmas and decision-making
    • King IV recommendations
    • Steps of an ethics management programme
    • Code of Ethics of the Compliance Institute of Southern Africa
  • Cost-benefit analysis – does it pay to be ethical?

2.3 Specialist programme for ethics officers and ethics champions (four days)

Name of course Content
Module 1: High risk occupational crimes and irregularities (Day one: full day)
  • Module one: Introduction to occupational crimes, workplace irregularities and unethical behaviour
    • High risk criminal acts (corruption, fraud and theft)
    • Workplace irregularities
    • Unethical conduct
    • Workplace examples
    • Addressing the fear of blowing the whistle
Module 2: Ethics expertise (Day two: full day)
  • Module two: Business ethics
    • Why ethics matters
    • Being an ethical person/organisation
    • Ethical dilemmas and decision-making
    • Choosing corporate values and developing an ethics statement
    • Creating ethics management structures
Module 3: Anti-corruption legislation and best practice standards (Day three: full day)
  • Module 3: Why ethics champions are imperative – recent legislative developments and best practice standards
    • Local and international legislation
    • Compliance framework
    • Due diligence requirements
    • Best practice standards
    • Duties and the Social and Ethics Committee
Module 4: Facilitation and presentation skills – training your staff (Day four: full day)
  • Module 4: Facilitation and presentation skills – training your staff
  • The difference between presentation and facilitation
  • Different ways of communicating 
    • Defining verbal and non-verbal communication
  • Key pointers to remember when presenting/facilitating
  • Preparations before presenting or facilitating a session
  • Having integrity
  • Being professional
    • Looking the part
    • Acting the part
  • The art of listening
  • Presentation exercise
    • Individual presentations and group critique

 3.   SCHOOL AND TERTIARY STUDENTS

Name of course Content
Introduction to corporate ethics and etiquette (Full day)
  • Personal brand and reputation
  • Ethics in the workplace
    • Ethics vocabulary
    • Being ethical at work
    • Being professional at work
  • Etiquette in the workplace
    • Looking the part
    • Acting the part
  • Being a GREAT brand
The Ethics of social media (Half day)
  • The ethical dimensions of social media
    • Ethics vocabulary
    • Ethical decision-making
  • Risks associated with social media
    • Case law
    • Costs
  • Guidelines for using social media

The ProEthics e-learning training solution

Our e-learning training solution provides an easy-to-use, effective alternative to class room training.

Our e-learning programmes are designed and developed to enable practical application in the workplace, and ultimately improve employee and corporate performance. Adult learning methods are applied to contextualise theoretical information. A practical video with audio teaches the content step by step and explains the theory page by page. Real-life industry specific case studies and examples are used to illustrate the impact of, e.g. unethical behaviour, on the reputation and performance of an organisation. Video material, images, articles, studies, etc. are made available as resources for further consumption and to foster understanding and contextualisation.

Benefits of ProEthics e-learning training

  • All learning material is available in one centralised place.
  • Participants can learn in their own time and it is not office bound.
  • Users may repeat the programme at no additional cost.
  • Own notes, sketches, highlights etc. within the digital learning material can be made to optimise learning.
  • Assessments can be incorporated after each module.
  • The latest information and research are added to the course and instantly made available to users.
  • There is a significant saving in costs as compared to classroom training.

PLEASE CONTACT US FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF YOUR OWN CUSTOMISED, UNIQUE E-LEARNING PROGRAMME/COURSE.

OUR FACILITATORS

As the founder of ProEthics, Dr Janette Minnaar is our principal facilitator. She is an advocate, who has a doctorate in criminal law (LLD) from the University of Pretoria. She has trained and consulted, not only large corporations, municipalities, government departments and tertiary institutions in South Africa, but also provided her services to smaller enterprises and clients in Ghana, Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Namibia.

Janette is joined by Adv Simoné van Helsdingen who holds an LLB in law from the University of Pretoria (UP) and a Master’s degree (LLM) in criminal law both of which she obtained cum laude. She was a full-time member of the Pretoria Society of Advocates and is still practising law.

Download CV –  Dr Janette Minnaar

Download CV – Adv Simoné van Helsdingen

National Facilitators

We are assisted by a national group of 25 knowledgeable, skilled and expert facilitators, who are representative of South Africa’s cultural and ethnic diversity. This gives us the ability to train large numbers of employees in a short period of time.

THE ProEthics APPROACH TO TRAINING

Training Icon

Our specialised training programmes are designed to have practical application in the workplace, and ultimately improve employee and organisational performance.

Adult learning methods are applied to contextualise theoretical information. Interaction, questions and debates between participants and the facilitators are encouraged. Real-life industry specific case studies are used to illustrate the impact of, e.g. unethical behaviour, on the reputation and performance of an organisation.

Interactive and practical group exercises and video material are used as training tools.

QUALITY ASSURANCE

Dr Minnaar is accredited for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for her courses in corporate governance, anti-corruption and ethics.

In order to ensure the highest professional service delivery and quality, ProEthics requests delegates to anonymously complete a written evaluation form at the end of each training session. This provides continuous quality assurance to our clients.

TRAINING DELIVERABLES

When ProEthics develop and present training programmes, we typically meet the following deliverables:

    • A comprehensive set of PowerPoint slides (approximately 80 slides per one-day programme) is developed in accordance to our clients’ needs.
    • An electronic copy of the training material is provided to clients for printing and branding purposes (unless otherwise requested).
    • Our experienced facilitators travel to clients’ sites to present the training in person and answer questions and concerns from delegates.
    • Ongoing research relevant to the training is done.
    • During a longer project timeframe, the training material is continuously updated to reflect the latest legislation, developments and research.
    • Formal written feedback is provided to our clients.
    • Where risks or gaps in business policies or procedures are identified, formal recommendations are made to client project leaders for consideration.

BENEFITS OF PROETHICS TRAINING

When an instruction for the development of training material is received from a client, an interactive consultation process is followed to gain an accurate understanding of the target audience, objectives of the training and the desired outcomes. All relevant research is done to ensure that the training is aligned with the policies of the client and that the training meets the demands of relevant legislation, “watchdog” bodies and industry standards. The training content is designed to also enhance the recommendations made by the King IV Corporate Governance Report. All our programmes include a focus on ethical values and how these values should be lived in daily work life.

Delegates are empowered to understand how to avoid legal and reputational risks — thereby the good name of the organisation is protected.

Investing in training in order to build a healthy culture has been proven to be financially worthwhile. This was proven in a Harvard Law Review of 2014. In the article, corporate culture is defined as the principles and values guiding the behaviour of an organisation’s employees. The values that organisations most commonly advertise are: innovation, integrity and respect. Advertised values, however, do not seem to be very important in terms of an organisation’s actual performance. The values that employees perceive are more important than the advertised ones. High levels of perceived integrity lead to improvements in productivity, profitability and industrial relations, and to the organisation being more attractive to job applicants.

Corporate culture is important because it provides guidance when employees face choices that cannot be properly regulated before the event. Maintaining a culture of integrity may have short-term costs, because, for example an employee will place customers’ satisfaction above immediate higher profits. But there are significant long-term benefits, however, in terms of retaining the loyalty of customers.

 


DEVELOPMENT OF TRAINING MATERIAL

In the development of our training material we contextualise the information shared with the delegates, in order to not just impart information, but to truly bring delegates to a new level of understanding (Rhema). Each delegate needs to come to a personal revelation of what the information shared means in his/her workplace, this leads to greater wisdom. Leaders, managers and staff are equally empowered to make the right decisions and do the right thing. Through the process of contextualisation, participants gain better judgement and become more effective and successful in their work. This can be illustrated by the following model developed by Prof Gustav Puth:

Wisdom Diagram

In order to maximise adult learning, we follow a process whereby:

  • information (facts provided or learned about something or someone – Oxford Dictionaries)
  • is transferred into
  • knowledge, (facts, information, and skills acquired through experience or education; the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject – Oxford Dictionaries)
  • understanding (perceive the intended meaning – Oxford Dictionaries)
  • and contextualised (wisdom – the quality of having experience, knowledge, and good judgement; the quality of being wise – Oxford Dictionaries) by each person.

In short, information must be understood and contextualised by each person. It must “make sense” (wisdom) for learners in their respective work environments. This “empowers” people to apply the newly gained information/knowledge/understanding/wisdom in the desired way.